Can Prisoners Be Free?

Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom” (2 Corinthians 3:17 NIV).

Perhaps the greatest benefit that we have as American citizens is our civil rights and liberties as identified in the Bill of Rights.   We enjoy the freedom of speech, assembly, due process of law, etc. 

The early Israelites were required to follow 613 Commandments from God as provided to Moses.  The Mosaic Law begins with the Ten Commandments and includes the many rules of religious observance given in the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, called the Pentateuch. 

God made a new Covenant with us through the blood of His Son, Jesus.  As Christians, we enjoy true freedom due to His sacrifice.  Romans 8:2 reads, “because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death.”  We have freedom over sin and death, and we will enjoy life everlasting with the Father.

However, I see many people each day that are walking the streets but are not free.  They are enslaved to their sins, unwilling to repent, and unable to enjoy the freedom that comes from the Spirit.   Some are enslaved to drugs, work, fear of the future, etc.  This begs the question, how can a baptized Christian that is an American citizen be enslaved if they are walking down the street?

Sadly, these people have imprisoned themselves in their minds.  This is the worst sort of prison because they have no hope.  Perhaps Jesus was addressing those without hope when He read from the scroll of the prophet Isaiah and said, “The Spirit of the Lord is on Me, because He has anointed Me to proclaim good news to the poor.  He has sent Me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Luke 4:18-19). 

So, what does hope have to with faith in God?  Everything.  The connection between hope and faith is explained in Hebrews 11:1. “Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.”  Those without hope do not truly understand that our God is the God of victory, power, and miracles.  Those without faith are not able to walk through the darkest valley and fear no evil as the Psalmist writes in Psalm 23:4.

However, I see many people each day that are walking the streets but are not free.  They are enslaved to their sins, unwilling to repent, and unable to enjoy the freedom that comes from the Spirit.   Some are enslaved to drugs, work, fear of the future, etc.  This begs the question, how can a baptized Christian that is an American citizen be enslaved if they are walking down the street?

Sadly, these people have imprisoned themselves in their minds.  This is the worst sort of prison because they have no hope.  Perhaps Jesus was addressing those without hope when He read from the scroll of the prophet Isaiah and said, “The Spirit of the Lord is on Me, because He has anointed Me to proclaim good news to the poor.  He has sent Me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Luke 4:18-19). 

So, what does hope have to with faith in God?  Everything.  The connection between hope and faith is explained in Hebrews 11:1. “Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.”  Those without hope do not truly understand that our God is the God of victory, power, and miracles.  Those without faith are not able to walk through the darkest valley and fear no evil as the Psalmist writes in Psalm 23:4.

I have been blessed to participate in a national prison ministry known as Kairos.  This ministry brings a Gospel message to people that have committed very violent crimes and are unlikely to be released back into society.  At my first visit to the Angola Prison near St. Francisville, La, I was struck by the freedom of several of the inmates.  I heard joy in their voices and saw it in their eyes.  I was initially surprised and then I listened to testimony after testimony from the inmates about what God has done for them.  Years ago, this prison was one of the worst in the country due to number of violent crimes occurring inside the prison.  The warden at the time-built a church in the prison, introduced Kairos, and distributed Bibles. 

In short, he pointed the inmates to Jesus.  The Holy Spirit was welcome and as a result there was freedom.  “Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom” (2 Corinthians 3:17, emphasis added).

If you are seeking freedom, the right next step is to ask the Holy Spirit to search you and reveal any areas of your life that have you imprisoned.  Confession and repentance are essential to forgiveness and freedom.  Shame and fear are not fruits of the Spirit.  2 Timothy 1:7 teaches, “For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love, and self-discipline.”   May be all be so blessed as to live as freely as those prisoners I met in Angola. 

Prayer:  Dear God, Thank you for your Son and the gift that we have to live as Easter people.  Thank you for the forgiveness of our sins and life-everlasting in your Church Triumphant. Send your Holy Spirit to search us and reveal to us those things that imprison us.  Give us the courage and strength to rid ourselves of the sin and shame that clings so tightly and separates us from you. 

Meet the Author

Todd Shupe is a Men’s Ministry Specialist through the General Commission of United Methodist Men and is in training to be a Certified Lay Minister through the Louisiana Conference of the United Methodist Church. He currently serves as the President of the Baton Rouge District of United Methodist Men and is a Board Member for Gulf South Men and serves on the Action Team for The Kingdom Group. He is a volunteer for the Walk to Emmaus, Grace Camp, and Iron Sharpens Iron. Todd resides in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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